INDIANAPOLIS — A woman accused robbing four banks in the span of seven days was arrested this month in Indianapolis, the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department announced Wednesday.

Sierra Hunt, age 54, is facing four counts of robbery after she admitted to the crimes during an interview with police, per IMPD.

The first robbery took place on April 9 at the Chase Bank located at 6910 W. 38th St. on the city’s west side. Court documents state that a woman — later identified as Hunt — gave the teller a demand note and bag. The teller removed cash from the drawer and placed it in the bag along with the note, as commanded. Hunt then left the bank with $6,500.

The next robbery occurred on April 11 at the Chase Bank located at 2302 Cunningham Rd. in Speedway. Hunt again gave the teller a demand note and made off with $7,255 in cash, per court documents. This time, however, she did not take the demand note back. Documents state that the note was written on the back of a Family Dollar receipt and said:

“NO DYE PACKS! DO NOT GET ANYONE HURT! 20’S, 10’S, 5’S 100’S only! ANY DYE PACKS AND 2 men will come in and start hurting people! KEEP ONE HAND WHERE I CAN SEE IT AT ALL times!”

Detectives took the receipt and found that it was from a debit card purchase on April 10. The card information returned the name Sierra Hunt, per documents. Detectives checked Family Dollar surveillance video from the time of the purchase and spotted a woman they believed to be Hunt. She matched the suspect description given by the banks, per court documents. A check of Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles records found that Hunt has a maroon Honda Accord registered in her name. Her BMV physical description also matched the description given by the banks and surveillance video, documents state.

The third robbery happened on April 13 at the Chase Bank located at 8751 Michigan Rd. on Indy’s north side. Once again, Hunt gave the teller a note and made off with cash — $3,000 worth this time, per court documents. Authorities noted that the description given by the bank matched Hunt, and surveillance video showed a maroon sedan, just like the Honda registered to Hunt.

The final robbery was at the Chase Bank located at the intersection of S. East Street and National Ave. on the south side of Indianapolis. Documents state that Hunt gave that teller a note that said:

“BOTH HANDS WHERE I CAN SEE THEM! ONLY 100’s, 50’s, 20’s NO DYE BACKS!”

The teller gave Hunt $9,900 in cash, and she left the bank on foot, per court documents.

Authorities checked surveillance video from a neighboring business and saw the same maroon Honda Accord park near an abandoned building prior to the robbery. An individual was then seen exiting the car and entering the bank before running back to the car, documents say.

IMPD and the FBI then sent personnel to various possible addresses believed to be associated with Hunt. The FBI found the Honda Accord registered to Hunt at a home in the 3100 block of S. Tibbs Ave on Indy’s southwest side. Authorities observed Hunt leave the home and drive off in the Honda. Detectives followed Hunt before pulling her over on I-465 near W. 10th Street and taking her into custody.

During an interview with police, Hunt admitted to all four robberies and initialed surveillance photos from three of the banks acknowledging the person in the photo is her, per court documents. She told detectives she was using the money to pay off medical bills and person loans.

“Hunt stated each time she got only a little bit (of money), that she had thought banks gave a lot of money,” the documents state. “Hunt said because of this she had to keep doing it (the robberies), to get the money she needed to help her kids and grandson. Hunt stated she never thought that she would do something like this. Hunt then admitted to all four of the above-mentioned bank robberies, passing a demand note at each one and taking the money. Hunt stated she did not have a gun during the robberies.”

After Hunt’s arrest was announced, IMPD Officer William Young commented on the robberies.

“We’ve seen it before with serial robberies,” said Young. “Maybe they see it as a prime opportunity. They’ve gotten away with robbing one business, so they continue to rob the same business.”

Young advised to do exactly what the robber demands if ever involved in a bank robbery.