INDIANAPOLIS — An economic impact study conducted by Rockport Analytics concluded that the 2022 College Football Playoff National Championship weekend, held in Indianapolis between Jan. 7-10, generated $156.6 million, exceeding the pre-game estimate of $150 million.

“Our team invested more than five years of strategic planning towards executing a successful CFP weekend,” said Mark Howell, chairman of the board for the Indianapolis Host Committee. “We are proud the event created a lasting, positive effect in our community through numerous legacy projects while also adding a much-needed boost to our economy to kickoff 2022.”  

According to the study, the national championship game generated $53 million in local wages for tourism and other industry workers. Visitors spent on average $281 per day in Indianapolis, exceeding the $177 per day typically spent by visitors.

“Our team of economists invested more than six months towards researching the impact of the College Football Playoff National Championship event weekend on Indianapolis,” said Ken McGill, managing director of Rockport Analytics. “We feel confident in our findings and enjoy working with the City of Indianapolis, a destination continuing to host major sporting events.” 

The study found the average stay of a game-ticketed visitor in Indianapolis was 3.4 days.

More Georgia Bulldogs fans were found to have made the trip to Indianapolis with 24 percent of visitors coming from the state of Georgia while only 10 percent came from Alabama.

According to the findings, 68% of national championship visitors stated it was their first trip to Indy and 72% cited they’d be likely to return.

With 22.6 million people tuning in to watch the Georgia Bulldogs defeat the Alabama Crimson Tide 33-18, it meant tons of broadcasting eyes on Indianapolis and media-related visitors staying in the city. An estimated $34 million was generated from over 1,000 media-related visitors.

“All-in-all, this event weekend provided our community a strong start to the year,” said Susan Baughman, president of the Indianapolis Host Committee.