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Indiana reports first flu-related death of season occurred in Marion County

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) today confirmed the state’s first influenza-related death of the season. The Marion County Public Health Department confirms the death occurred in Marion County.

“This is a tragic reminder that we should never underestimate how serious the flu can be,” said State Health Commissioner Kris Box, M.D., FACOG. “Vaccination is the best defense against influenza, so please make sure you and your loved ones receive a flu shot.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends everyone age 6 months and older get a flu vaccine each year. Box said that because infants younger than 6 months can’t be vaccinated, it’s important that anyone in a household where a young baby lives or visits get a flu shot to protect the child. Healthcare workers also are urged to get a flu vaccine to reduce their risk of transmitting illness to their patients.

It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies that protect against flu to develop in the body, so the CDC recommends early vaccination. However, the flu vaccine can be administered at any time during the season, which typically runs from October through May.

Influenza is a viral infection of the respiratory tract. It is spread by respiratory droplets released when infected people cough or sneeze nearby or when people touch surfaces or objects contaminated with those infectious respiratory droplets. People can also become infected by touching surfaces or objects contaminated with influenza viruses and then touching their eyes, mouths or noses.

Although anyone can get the flu, some people are at higher risk of flu-related complications, such as pneumonia, hospitalization and death. More than 110 Hoosiers died from influenza-associated illnesses during the 2018-19 flu season. Those most at risk include pregnant women, young children (especially those too young to get vaccinated), people with chronic illnesses, people who are immunocompromised and the elderly. It is especially important for these individuals to be vaccinated each year.

Common signs and symptoms of the flu include:

  • fever of 100° Fahrenheit or greater
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • cough
  • muscle aches
  • sore throat
  • runny or stuffy nose

People can help prevent the spread of flu by washing their hands frequently and thoroughly, avoiding touching their eyes, nose and mouth with their hands and staying home when sick. Hoosiers should practice the “Three Cs” to help prevent the spread of flu and other infectious diseases:

  • Clean: Properly wash your hands frequently with warm, soapy water.
  • Cover: Cover your cough and sneeze into your arm or a disposable tissue.
  • Contain: Stay home from school or work when you are sick to keep your germs from spreading.

Flu shots are available through the Marion County Public Health Department’s district health offices. The cost is $20 for ages 2 and older. Flu shots are free for children under the age of 2.

The health department is also hosting special walk-in flu shot clinics around the county in the month of October. The last of these special clinics are scheduled for Thursday, October 24 at the following locations:

Cathedral Kitchen
1350 N. Pennsylvania Street
9-11 a.m.

Englewood Christian Church
57 N. Rural Street
4-6 p.m.

To learn more about receiving flu vaccine through the Marion County Public Health Department, please call (317) 221-2122 or visit MarionHealth.org/immunize.

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