Family arrested for using counterfeit money to buy milkshakes

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BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (September 14, 2015 ) – A family of three is busted for using counterfeit money to buy milkshakes.

Late Saturday night, investigators received a call from the Steak n’ Shake in Bloomington.

Investigators say 41-year old Suzanne Allen and her 18-year-old son Diego Diaz each bought a milkshake and paid with separate $20 bills.  A few minutes later, Allen’s husband, Simon came in, ordered a shake, and then went out to the car to get a $20 bill.

The clerk became suspicious and turned him away.  Detectives stopped a car matching the clerk’s description.

“Inside the trunk we found a number of uncut sheets of $20 bills that were just waiting to be used,” explains Captain Joe Qualters, with the Bloomington Police Department.

Detectives tracked the three to a hotel room at Shadeland Inn, on Indianapolis’s Near Northeast side.  Inside the room, they found printers and paper stock.

“This was something they had indicated they were trying to get money so they would no longer have to live in a hotel but clearly this is not the proper way to do it,” explains Qualters.

The majority of counterfeiters will make small purchases to try and get the most profit for their fake money.

“The food items at Steak n’ Shake were about $3 and some change. So for every $20 bill they passed there would’ve essentially been a $17 dollar profit.  You could see that would add up pretty quickly,” explains Qualters.

So far, investigators have found receipts linking the suspects to at least 10 locations throughout Martinsville, Indianapolis and Bloomington.

Investigators called the suspect’s counterfeit cash some of the “higher quality” bills they’ve seen.

“In this particular case, it appears that the bills were accepted far more times than they were rejected,” explains Qualters.

All three are charged with counterfeiting.

 

 

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