New list ranks IU Health, Eskenazi among worst hospitals for central line infections

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - Two of Indy's biggest hospitals are responding to being ranked among the worst in the country at preventing serious infections.

IU Health and Eskenazi Health's downtown hospitals are on a Consumer Reports list of the lowest scoring teaching hospitals in the country when it comes to preventing central line infections. That's when bacteria gets into your body through an IV. (To see the rankings and numbers of infection at your local hospital, click here.)

Consumer Reports found the most common causes of infection were hospital workers not washing their hands or not following proper protocol.

"There's a specific process that the hospital staff can use to insert a central line in a clean sterile way. And if they follow this protocol they have a good chance of not infecting the patient. And that includes washing your hands," explained Doris Peter, Director of Consumer Reports' Health Ratings Center.

Both Eskenazi Health and IU Health told CBS4 they're making significant strides and the numbers will eventually show that turnaround.

Here is a statement from IU Health about the ranking:

“The organization applauds transparency and is highly focused on efforts to address this important issue. We have achieved a substantial reduction of cases in the past several years due to renewed, intensive training for every care provider and the use of advanced technology. The health and safety of our patients remain our highest priority.”

Eskenazi Health also responded to our request for a comment:

"Eskenazi Health is continuously working to eliminate infections altogether and has made a concerted effort to drive down infections associated with central lines, resulting in a 90 percent reduction since 2014. Current data would place Eskenazi Health on the list of “Top Performing” hospitals, with central line infections being reduced to approximately two out of nearly 18,700 admissions to the Sidney & Lois Eskenazi Hospital annually. Staff and provider input and engagement have been key to our successful effort to reduce central line infections."

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s