Indy’s Most Haunted: Former patients believed to haunt Randolph County Infirmary

RANDOLPH COUNTY, Ind. – The Randolph County Infirmary is a popular destination for ghost hunters across the world.

The property located on U.S. 27 south of Winchester was originally owned by a farmer in the 1800’s.

The farmer and his wife offered to house people who were unable to live alone in exchange for money from the state.

The first infirmary was built in 1851, but it was destroyed two years later in a fire.

A second infirmary was built in the exact same spot, but a few years later it was closed when the county deemed the living conditions unsanitary.

The third infirmary, and the one still standing today, was built in 1899.

The infirmary housed orphans and people who were poor, mentally unstable, and sick.

Throughout the years, many people died in the infirmary, and there is a cemetery on the property with 50 unmarked graves.

There were a number of tuberculosis deaths; one person was pushed out of a second floor window; there are also reports of people hanging themselves.

Five patients were still living in the infirmary when it closed in 2008.

Chris Musgrove, Adam Kimmell, and Dan Allen purchased the building from the county in 2015.

Given the history of the building, they wanted to restore it and rent it out to ghost hunters.

In the past year, the infirmary has been booked by more than 60 film crews, and it's reserved every weekend through 2017.

Most everyone who enters the infirmary experiences some type of haunting: doors slamming without explanation, the sound of children giggling and little footsteps in the halls, women screaming, crashing sounds in the cafeteria and the basement, and apparitions and shadowy figures seen through ambient light.

If you're interested in taking a ghost tour, they still have availabilities on week days. You can stay all night in the infirmary with up to 10 people for $300.

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