Indy’s Red line earns regional support, competes for state and federal funding

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INDIANAPOLIS, Indiana – The City of Indianapolis has taken big steps toward connecting the Indy with a one of a kind electric bus transportation system. The proposed Red line’s first phase would run from Broad Ripple to the University of Indianapolis, passing through downtown Indianapolis.

“Transit can change people’s lives by connecting them to employment and new opportunities.  It can strengthen local economies and attract young talent,” says Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard.

Indy’s first rapid transit line has earned regional support and is now in the process of competing for state and federal funding.

“All of the incredible news you are hearing about the Red line has been years in the making,” says Mayor Ballard.

The 35 mile Red line will run from Carmel to Greenwood through Indianapolis.  It will serve more than 100,000 residents within a half mile of the route.

The transit would connect one of every four Indianapolis jobs and seven of the city’s largest employers.

“It is time to make it easier for the people who are ready, willing, and able to work, to get to work,” says Shiel Sexton Managing Partner Brian Sullivan.

The cost of the first phase is $60 million. The federal grant would cover 80% of the cost. IndyGo will find out if they are approved for the federal grant by April. IndyGo will apply for a state grant to pay for the rest of the construction costs. Once up and running the operating costs would be covered by property taxes. IndyGo is now looking to the public for input, scheduling meetings throughout the upcoming months.

“It is time to acknowledge that we cannot call ourselves a world class city until we join the rest of the top tier cities who invest in mass transit,” says Sullivan.

If approved, construction would start in 2017 and should be completed in 2018.

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